On Thursday “Palestinian” terrorist Rasmieh Odeh of Chicago walked out of a Detroit jail on $50,000 bond. The order for release was granted by U.S. District Judge Gershwin Drain. On November 10 in Detroit she was found guilty of naturalization fraud stemming to her failure to disclose convictions from a 1969 terrorist bombing in a Jerusalem supermarket and the British Consulate that resulted in the deaths of 2 Hebrew University students. At the time of the conviction Drain expressed concerns that Odeh was a flight risk.

Odeh would never have been granted admission into the U.S. had she been honest about her record because her involvement with the bombing, according to Drain, “demonstrated a lack of good moral character that is required for eligibility to immigrate.”

At some point between the guilty verdict and Drain’s initial decision to hold her without bond pending sentencing, Odeh told a crowd of supporters outside court that she didn’t receive justice and described the verdict as racist. Prosecutors said that attitude coupled with her “serial dishonesty” as well as repeated violations of the court’s limitations on her testimony were sufficient to show she couldn’t be trusted to adhere to court orders and subsequently show up for the sentencing hearing.

At the time judge Drain agreed, but has since had a change of heart which is nothing short of mysterious. Drain has now decided to grant the pre-sentence bond while still citing his concerns about Odeh’s “seeming proclivity for dishonesty, as well as her apparent disdain for this Court’s Orders.” Reports indicate Drain’s latest decision is based on “Odeh’s strong community ties in Chicago.” (wink) You can read Drain’s order here.

The guilty verdict could cost Odeh 10 years in a U.S. prison and according to Drain she faces “certain removal from the United States upon completion of that sentence.” Odeh was sentenced to life in prison by Israeli courts for her part in the bombings but was released as one of 76 “Palestinian” prisoners exchanged for one Israeli soldier.

Odeh’s sentencing is scheduled for March 10th. In the meantime the 67-year-old will be required to show up for bi-weekly reports to the probation office.

Odeh runs daily operations at Chicago’s Arab American Action Network, a group that advocates for new immigrants and combats “anti-Muslim prejudice.”

jew-hater-released

U.S. President Barack Obama, also from Chicago, has close ties to the Arab American Action Network, including it’s founder Rashid Khalidi and former AAAN vice president Ali Abunimah(the following paragraphs are taken verbatim from the DiscovertheNetworks.org website but there is much more information there on the Obama/AAAN connection):

During his Illinois state senate years in the mid- to late 1990s, Barack Obama was a lecturer at the University of Chicago Law School, where he became friendly with Rashid Khalidi, a professor of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. Obama and his wife were regular dinner guests at Khalidi’s Hyde Park home.

Characterizing Israel as a “racist” state and “basically an apartheid system in creation,” Khalidi during the 1980s so strongly identified with the aims of Yasser Arafat’s PLO, which was designated as a terrorist group by the State Department at the time, that he repeatedly referred to himself as “we” when expounding on the PLO’s agenda. In the early 1990s, Khalidi was involved with the PLO’s so-called “guidance committee.” In 1995 Khalidi and his wife Mona founded the Arab American Action Network (AAAN), noted for its contention that Israel’s creation in 1948 was a “catastrophe” for Arab people. In 2001 and again in 2002, the Woods Fund of Chicago, with Obama serving on its board, made grants totaling $75,000 to the AAAN.

In 2003 Obama attended a farewell party in Khalidi’s honor when the latter was preparing to leave Chicago to embark on a new position at Columbia University. At this event, Obama paid public tribute to Khalidi as someone whose insights had been “consistent reminders to me of my own blind spots and my own biases.” Khalidi later told the largely pro-Palestinian attendees that Obama deserved their help in winning a U.S. Senate seat, stating: “You will not have a better senator under any circumstances.”

Onetime AAAN vice president Ali Abunimah of Electronic Intifada (a website that, like AAAN, refers to Israel’s creation as a “catastrophe”) once told interviewer Amy Goodman: “I knew Barack Obama for many years as my state senator — when he used to attend events in the Palestinian community in Chicago all the time. I remember personally introducing him onstage in 1999, when we had a major community fundraiser for the community center in Deheisha refugee camp in the occupied West Bank. And that’s just one example of how Barack Obama used to be very comfortable speaking up for and being associated with Palestinian rights and opposing the Israeli occupation.”

In June 2007 Abunimah recalled: “When Obama first ran for the Senate in 2004, the Chicago Jewish News interviewed him on his stance regarding Israel’s security fence. He accused the Bush administration of neglecting the ‘Israeli-Palestinian’ situation and criticized the security fence built by Israel to prevent terror attacks: ‘The creation of a wall dividing the two nations is yet another example of the neglect of this administration in brokering peace,’ Obama was quoted as saying.”

Also in 2007, Abunimah said: “The last time I spoke to Obama was in the winter of 2004 at a gathering in Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood. He was in the midst of a primary campaign to secure the Democratic nomination for the United States Senate seat he now occupies. But at that time polls showed him trailing. As he came in from the cold and took off his coat, I went up to greet him. He responded warmly, and volunteered, ‘Hey, I’m sorry I haven’t said more about Palestine right now, but we are in a tough primary race. I’m hoping when things calm down I can be more up front.’ He referred to my activism, including columns I was contributing to the The Chicago Tribune critical of Israeli and U.S. policy, ‘Keep up the good work!’”